Wednesday, August 5, 2015

The End of the Campaign...

My Friday night 5e Weird New World game is gong to be wrapping up on October 2. About half of my group will be leaving the area, and I think the general consensus is that we're going to switch to d6 Star Wars for a while. But before we do, this gives me an opportunity to really end a campaign, to bring it to a wrapping up point rather than just let it die like most do. Hell, the fact that this campaign has gone on for 20 sessions already is pretty amazing to me! That there are only 7 or 8 more sessions...

It might be a little early yet, but I'm trying to come up with ideas on how to end the campaign. I've been building up to a major confrontation against a chaos lord, but depending on what decisions the party makes, the last sessions may skew off.

So I guess I'm looking for some advice... how do you end a campaign, and make it memorable?

1 comment:

  1. I had a chance to do something like this with a Vampire: tM campaign way back. My solution had been a bit character driven, so it might not work the same way for a D&D game, but I thought I'd share it anyway. I made the last session something of an epilogue. The characters hadn't met each other for several years and several conflicting (and hidden) agendas made them meet up again in a deserted warehouse for one big show down. Each character had at least one of the others as an enemy (most without knowing it) and since it had been the last session, holding back wasn't necessary ... it had been a blast (with lots of casualties). I also put a count down on the whole thing and closed with a gang of werewolves storming the warehouse. The characters knew about it, too and it made sure that we were done as soon as the session was over ...

    I guess what I'm trying to say is, that if you have the chance to end it properly, it might be a good idea to end the regular game a session before the last sessions and make that last session the epilogue. The heroes are old then, each of them had a life and family (or whatever they are into, you could just ask the players: "Where do you see your character in 30 (?) years from now?"). Use the rules for old age and give them one last challenge where they have to assemble and go all in (an old nemesis, the daughter of an old nemesis ... someone might even call them out, taking a city hostage or something ...). Make it meaningful, even if (or especially when) they die. Anyway, that's how I'd do it :)

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